Restorative Justice

RESTORATIVE PRACTICES

Restorative Practices is a fairly broad term that describes a social science that studies how to build a network of relationship and achieve social discipline (see below) through community learning and decision making. The use of restorative practices helps to:

  • Reduce crime, violence, and bullying

  • Improve human behavior

  • Strengthen civil society

  • Provide effective leadership

  • Restore relationships

  • Repair harm

Restorative practices have their roots in Restorative Justice practices that originated in North American the 1970s. But restorative justice itself has roots in ancient and indigenous practices employed in cultures around the world, including Native American and First Nation Canadian, African, Celtic, Hebrew, and many others.

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RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

Restorative Justice views crime as more than breaking the law - it also causes harm to people, relationships, and the community. The foundational principles of restorative justice focus on:

  1. Crime causes harm and justice should focus on repairing that harm

  2. The people most affected by the crime should be able to participate in its resolution

  3. The responsibility of the government is to maintain order and of the community to build peace

This short video takes the concepts of restorative justice and introduces them in the context of our criminal justice system and punishment in general. It is a quick introduction to why 'traditional' punishment often does more harm that good, and leads us to why using restorative-focused practices with youth is important.

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NEUROSEQUENTIAL MODEL

The neurosequential model is a trauma-informed way of describing how the brain and body function. This model forms the basis of how we interact with youth and how and why they may or may not act and react like adults would like.

  • The brainstem is where our automatic functions live; things we do without a thought. Breathing; heartbeat; regulating body temperature; blinking; etc.

  • The cerebellum is where our movement memories live. These are things we may have to think about doing, but not how we do them. Walking; throwing a ball; jumping; etc.

  • The limbic system is next in line and is where our emotional and relational memories live.

This short video takes the concepts of restorative justice and introduces them in the context of our criminal justice system and punishment in general. It is a quick introduction to why 'traditional' punishment often does more harm that good, and leads us to why using restorative-focused practices with youth is important.

Join Portland Youth & Family Services for “This is Us Portland: A Community Talk on Restorative Practices” on February 16, 2022 at 6pm on Zoom. Our speakers: Joe Brummer, Trainer, Author, Consultant; Justin Carbonella, Middletown Youth Services Coordinator; and Peter Kisela, West Hartford Police, talk about the concepts of restorative practices.

Teen behavior can be challenging as they navigate their new-found independence. Restorative practices are a way to work to on relationships that may have been damaged – with people and communities – and can be an alternative to traditional punishment at home, in schools, and in society as a whole. Our speakers will talk about the origins and research based in the neurosequential model, punishment, stress, and trauma, and talk about its use in a variety of settings, including: policing, schools, juvenile review boards, and at home. We hope you take home some insight into youth thinking and some techniques to try.

A part of Youth & Family Services is the Restorative Justice Team, also known as the Juvenile Review Board. The Restorative Justice Team uses a restorative approach with youth who have gotten in trouble; either as diversion from arrest, or as a preventative intervention. For more information, please contact Jesse at (860) 342-6758. To pre-register for the talk, please click here.

ZOOM LINK: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/82834356630?pwd=TGo0N0pGOE0xejdGTkpabkErOFhkZz09

Meeting ID: 828 3435 6630               Password: YSB